Imagine if all the photographs from your life were stolen from you. Photos of you blowing out candles on your 18th birthday, basking in the sun on holiday, looking gleeful at graduation, or awestruck at a friend’s wedding. Imagine if these photographs from every chapter of your life were harvested by a stranger who used technology to crop and cut the pictures as if for a collage. Imagine if one day, by total happenstance, you not only see that your face has been plastered all over the internet but that it has been placed on someone else’s naked body and framed as pornography.

These are the unsettling dangers of deepfake porn. In recent years, deepfakes – which are videos and pictures of a person whose face and body have been digitally altered so that they appear to be someone else – have gained a lot of attention due to the risk they hold politically. Some deepfakes are harmless (see apps like TikTok for a host of counterfeit videos of Vladimir Putin and Joe Biden dancing together). But some also pose a malicious threat to diplomacy and national security owing to their unmatched power in blurring the boundary between what is classified as accurate and what is factitious. Yet in the ongoing discussion of the political ramifications of deepfakes, we have side-lined the primary victims of this technology in the process: women.